How Did Jesus Recruit His Disciples?

The recruitment of the disciples by Jesus was a critical aspect of his ministry. It was through these individuals that he would spread his teachings and ultimately, change the course of history.

But how did Jesus go about selecting these individuals? Let’s take a closer look.

The Call to Discipleship

Jesus’ approach to recruiting disciples was unique and unconventional for his time. He did not select the wealthy or powerful individuals of society, but rather ordinary people who were willing to follow him. In fact, some of his first disciples were fishermen – a profession that was considered lowly in Jewish society.

One example is found in Matthew 4:18-22, where Jesus calls upon Simon Peter and his brother Andrew while they are fishing. He says to them, “Come, follow me, and I will send you out to fish for people.” They immediately leave their nets and follow him.

Choosing the Twelve

As Jesus’ ministry gained momentum, he selected twelve men from among his followers to become his closest disciples. This group would be known as “the Twelve” or “the Apostles,” and they would play a crucial role in spreading Jesus’ message after his death.

The selection process is described in Mark 3:13-19:

“And he went up on the mountain and called to him those whom he desired, and they came to him. And he appointed twelve (whom he also named apostles) so that they might be with him and he might send them out to preach.”

The Criteria for Selection

So what criteria did Jesus use when selecting these twelve individuals? According to Luke 6:12-16, he spent an entire night in prayer before making his decision. While we do not know exactly what he prayed for, it is clear that this decision was made with great care.

In general, it appears that Jesus chose individuals who were willing to leave behind their old lives and follow him. He also looked for those who had a willingness to learn and grow in their faith.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Jesus’ approach to recruiting disciples was unconventional for his time. He selected ordinary people who were willing to leave behind their old lives and follow him. Through his teachings and the work of his disciples, he would ultimately change the course of history.

As we reflect on Jesus’ recruitment strategy, we can see that it was not the qualifications or status of the individuals that mattered but rather their willingness to follow and learn from him. This is a lesson that we can apply to our own lives today – it is not our past accomplishments or social status that matter but rather our willingness to follow Christ and grow in our faith.