Is American History Capitalized?

When it comes to writing about American history, one question that often arises is whether or not to capitalize certain words, phrases, and titles. The rules around capitalization in American history can be a bit confusing, but fear not! In this article, we will explore the ins and outs of capitalization in American history.

Capitalization of Historical Events

Historical events such as the American Revolution, the Civil War, and the Great Depression are always capitalized. This is because they are proper nouns that refer to specific events in history. Similarly, any other major historical event should be capitalized.

Capitalization of Historical Documents

Titles of important historical documents such as the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution should also be capitalized. However, when referring to these documents in general terms, such as “the declaration” or “the constitution,” they should not be capitalized.

Capitalization of Historical Figures

When referring to a specific person from American history by their full name, it should always be capitalized. For example: George Washington or Abraham Lincoln. However, if you are referring to them in general terms (e.g., “the first president” or “the 16th president”), then it should not be capitalized.

Capitalization of Historical Time Periods

Time periods in American history such as the Roaring Twenties or the Gilded Age should always be capitalized since they are proper nouns that refer to specific eras. Similarly, any other major time period in American history should also be capitalized.

Capitalization of Historical Institutions and Organizations

Institutions and organizations that played significant roles in American history such as the Supreme Court or Congress should always be capitalized. Similarly, any other institutions or organizations that played an important part in American history should also be capitalized.

In Conclusion

Capitalization in American history can be a bit confusing, but by following these general rules, you can ensure that your writing is accurate and professional. Remember to always capitalize proper nouns such as historical events, documents, figures, time periods, and institutions.

On the other hand, general terms should not be capitalized. With these simple guidelines in mind, you will be well on your way to writing about American history with confidence and clarity.

  • Remember to always capitalize:
    • Historical events
    • Historical documents
    • Historical figures (when using their full name)
    • Historical time periods
    • Institutions and organizations that played significant roles in American history

  • Remember to never capitalize:
    • General terms such as “the declaration” or “the constitution”
    • Historical figures when referred to in general terms (e., “the first president” or “the 16th president”)

Sources:
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