What Is Considered the Worst American Defeat in History?

The history of the United States is filled with victories and defeats, ranging from the Revolutionary War to the Civil War to World War II. However, one particular defeat stands out as the worst in American history – the Battle of Little Bighorn.

The Battle of Little Bighorn

The Battle of Little Bighorn occurred on June 25-26, 1876, in Montana. The battle was fought between the United States Army, led by Lieutenant Colonel George Armstrong Custer, and a combined force of Native American tribes, including the Lakota Sioux and Cheyenne.

The Lead-Up to the Battle

In 1874, gold was discovered in the Black Hills region of South Dakota. This prompted an influx of miners into Native American lands. The U.S. government ordered all Native Americans to move to reservations by January 31, 1876 or face military action.

Many Native Americans refused to move and instead banded together under leaders such as Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse. Army was sent to enforce the order and bring the Native Americans back onto reservations.

The Battle

On June 25, 1876, Custer’s Seventh Cavalry attacked a large encampment of Native Americans along the Little Bighorn River. Custer divided his forces into three groups – one led by himself and two others led by Major Marcus Reno and Captain Frederick Benteen.

Custer’s group was quickly overwhelmed by a much larger force of Native Americans. All 210 soldiers under his command were killed in what became known as “Custer’s Last Stand.” Reno’s group suffered heavy losses as well but managed to hold off their attackers until reinforcements arrived.

The Aftermath

The Battle of Little Bighorn was a devastating defeat for the U. Army. In addition to Custer’s entire force being killed, another 50 or so soldiers were killed in Reno’s and Benteen’s groups. The total number of Native American casualties is unknown but estimates range from 30 to 300.

The defeat at Little Bighorn led to a shift in U. policy towards Native Americans. Instead of attempting to force them onto reservations, the government began negotiating treaties with tribes and recognizing their sovereignty.

  • The battle was fought between the U. Army and a combined force of Native American tribes.
  • Custer divided his forces into three groups, one led by himself and two others led by Major Marcus Reno and Captain Frederick Benteen.
  • All 210 soldiers under Custer’s command were killed.
  • The defeat led to a shift in U.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the Battle of Little Bighorn remains the worst defeat in American history. The loss of life on both sides was significant, but it also changed the way the U. government approached relations with Native Americans. Today, the site of the battle is preserved as a National Monument and serves as a reminder of this important moment in history.