What Measurements Did They Use in Ancient Greece?

When it comes to ancient civilizations, Greece is a name that always springs up. The ancient Greeks were pioneers in many fields, from philosophy to mathematics, and they also had their own system of measurement. In this article, we’ll take a closer look at the measurements used in Ancient Greece.

The Drachma

The drachma was the basic unit of currency in Ancient Greece. It was first introduced around 1100 BC and was still in use until the end of the fourth century BC. The weight of a drachma varied during different periods of Greek history, but it was generally around 4.3 grams.

The Stadion

The stadion was a unit of length used in Ancient Greece for measuring distances during races and athletic events. The length of one stadion varied throughout history and from region to region, but its most common length was around 185 meters.

The Cubit

The cubit was an ancient unit of measurement used for determining length or distance. It is believed that the cubit originated in Egypt and then spread to other parts of the ancient world, including Greece. The Greek cubit measured around 52.5 centimeters.

The Talent

The talent was a unit of weight used by the ancient Greeks for measuring precious metals such as gold and silver. One talent weighed approximately 26 kilograms.

The Ounce

The ounce was a unit of weight used by the ancient Greeks for measuring small quantities such as spices or perfumes. One ounce weighed approximately 28 grams.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the ancient Greeks had their own system of measurement that included units for currency, length, weight, and more. While some units varied throughout history and from region to region, they all played an important role in everyday life during this fascinating period of history.