Where in the Bible Does Jesus Teach His Disciples to Pray?

The Lord’s Prayer is one of the most well-known prayers in Christianity, and it serves as a model for many other prayers in the Bible. But where in the Bible does Jesus teach his disciples to pray?

In Matthew 6:9-13, Jesus gives a detailed explanation and instruction on how to pray. This passage is often referred to as The Lord’s Prayer or Our Father.

The Lord’s Prayer – Matthew 6:9-13

Verse 9:

Our Father in heaven,

This opening line acknowledges God as our father who is in heaven, indicating that he is above all and that we are his children.

Verse 10:

Your kingdom come,

This line refers to God’s kingdom and the desire for it to come to earth. It also emphasizes submission to God’s will.

Your will be done,

Here, we acknowledge that God’s will is greater than our own and that we should strive to align our desires with His.

Verse 11:

Give us this day our daily bread,

This line speaks of provision from God and trusting Him for our daily needs.

Verse 12:

And forgive us our debts,

We acknowledge our faults and ask God for forgiveness of our sins.

As we also have forgiven our debtors;

We are reminded of the importance of forgiving others just as we ask for forgiveness from God.

Verse 13:

And do not bring us into temptation,

We ask for God’s help in avoiding temptation and staying on the right path.

But deliver us from the evil one.

We ask for protection from Satan and his schemes.

This prayer serves as a model for how to approach God in prayer. It emphasizes submission to God’s will, acknowledging our need for forgiveness, and seeking provision and protection from God.

In Luke 11:1-4, Jesus also teaches his disciples how to pray. While this version of the prayer has some differences from the one in Matthew, it still serves as a model for how to approach God in prayer.

The Lord’s Prayer – Luke 11:1-4

Verse 2:

Father, hallowed be your name.

This opening line acknowledges God as holy and deserving of our reverence and worship.

Verse 3:

Your kingdom come.

Similar to Matthew’s version of the prayer, this line emphasizes the coming of God’s kingdom on earth.

Give us each day our daily bread,

This line is identical to Matthew’s version and speaks of trusting God for our daily needs.

Verse 4:

And forgive us our sins,

In Luke’s version, we ask for forgiveness of our sins rather than debts. This still emphasizes the importance of acknowledging our faults and asking for forgiveness from God.

For we ourselves also forgive everyone who is indebted to us.

We are reminded once again of the importance of forgiving others just as we ask for forgiveness from God.

And do not lead us into temptation.’

This line is similar to Matthew’s version but phrased slightly differently. We ask for help in avoiding temptation and staying on the right path.

Both versions of The Lord’s Prayer emphasize the importance of submission to God’s will, forgiveness, and acknowledging our need for provision and protection from God.

In conclusion, Jesus teaches his disciples to pray in both Matthew 6:9-13 and Luke 11:1-4. These prayers serve as models for how to approach God in prayer, emphasizing submission to God’s will, forgiveness, and seeking provision and protection from Him.